Sandhills Benefit Luncheon & Silent Auction for B&GH sets record of support

June 25, 2019

Pinehurst, NC – Nearly 200 individuals gathered Monday, June 17, at the Pinehurst Members Club for the 15th Annual Sandhills Benefit Luncheon and Silent Auction to support the children at Boys and Girls Homes of North Carolina (B&GH).

“Thanks to each of you for being here today,” said event emcee Grady Little. “Thank you to the table hostesses who filled their tables. Thanks to our sponsors. Thank you to the businesses, civic groups and bikers who filled the tables again this year.”

This year’s event raised more than $40,000 to support the children served by the non-profit organization based in Lake Waccamaw. Since its founding in 1954, B&GH has served more than 7,500 children from across the state, including many from Moore County.

“According to U.S. Children’s Defense Fund studies there are more than 16 million children living in poverty,” said B&GH President Gary Faircloth. “Each year, there are 6.6 million children abused or neglected.

“You folks are here today because you care a whole awful lot,” Faircloth continued. “You are giving so much of your time, talent and treasure to be here today. On behalf of our kids, from the bottom of my heart, I want to say thank you for what you do, and what you are doing today, to make a difference.”

B&GH provides a comprehensive array of services for children and youth who have been removed from their homes due to abuse, neglect or other family dysfunction. As many as 320 vulnerable children are cared for through the residential, community-based services, and school program provided by B&GH at any given time.

Actress and writer Joyce Reehling performed a series of monologues based on the experiences of children who are served by B&GH.

“These monologues are based on case histories that were sent to me,” she said in introduction. “These are composites. They are based on truths, but they are fictional for today. It would be humiliating to the kids for me to come up here and tell their story because they are difficult stories to hear.”

Reehling shared the stories of Gwen who went from hating school to discovering her talent for computers, Morgan who learned the importance of care for self, and Rylan who died from the abuse he suffered at the hands of his parents and his sisters who were saved.

“It’s as if our kids were running out of a burning building,” Reehling said. “Some are burned nearly to death. Some die in the blaze. And some need time to heal their burns and their souls. All who make it out of the inferno of neglect and abuse can get to be happy, healthy, and whole if we have time and resources. I think of Rylan and those like him every day. Some do die in the fires of neglect, but we are in the business of rebuilding those who make it out.”

Reehling’s powerful performance earned a standing ovation. Her presence was the result of the planning by a dedicated committee under the leadership of Camille Bailey who coordinated the event this year. Bailey was joined by Cindy Boals, Angela Boles, Ray Cockrell, Meg Finnin, Marion Gaida, Betty Hurst, Debi Little, Connie Monds, Linda Oldham, James Rupard, and Sherry Willis.

“I’ve always had this great admiration for people who go on mission trips from our church,” said Grady Little. “They go to foreign countries and do so much good. But we here in this room, this is our mission field today. We’re going on a mission trip right here to help Boys and Girls Homes. It doesn’t take a lot for us to reach in our pocket just a little bit.”

Anyone interested in learning more about joining the committee for next year’s event should contact Camille Bailey at 910-420-3032.

About Boys and Girls Homes of North Carolina

Boys and Girls Homes of North Carolina, Inc., has been helping children since 1954. Since then, more than 7,500 children have benefitted from the services of the not-for-profit, 501(c)3 agency. Its mission is to provide a comprehensive array of services for children and youth who have been removed from their homes due to abuse, neglect or other family dysfunction. B&GH offers adoption, family and therapeutic foster care, free children’s therapy, as well as residential care on the campus at Lake Waccamaw. The campus features a SACS-accredited school with a middle and high school curriculum, vocational education, recreation facilities, farm, chapel and cottage life. As many as 320 vulnerable children are cared for through the residential, community-based services, and school program provided by B&GH at any given time. B&GH operates its program, services and activities in compliance with federal nondiscrimination laws. B&GH is nationally accredited by the Council on Accreditation.

Return to Fall 2019 Communiqué Newsletter